Posts Tagged ‘self-esteem’

Growing Self-Esteem

December 16, 2016

Self-esteem is a loaded concept. We don’t have enough, or we have too much. Maybe it causes flashbacks of awkward teen years, or reminds you of someone who thinks to highly of himself.

Growing self-esteem means fostering confidence in yourself and your abilities. It reflects an overall sense of value or worth and filters our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Self-esteem impacts our physical, emotional, and mental health, and it plays a role in our relationships and jobs.

If you are someone looking to better your self-confidence, here are some practical steps to take inventory of your thoughts.

Triggers – First, identify what or who triggers negative thinking. A difficult coworker? Checking your bank account? Interactions with certain family members?

Self-talk – Next, listen to your thinking, or “self-talk.” What do you tell yourself? is it based on fact or emotion? Rational or irrational? Perhaps you are simply assuming the worst-case scenario.

Accuracy – Are your thoughts true? If not, challenge them. Often times our thoughts are influenced more by perception than reality. We jump to conclusions, downplay the positive, or overgeneralize.

Positivity – Finally, replace negative thoughts with positive ones. Avoid thinking of “should have” and “could have” scenarios. When mistakes are made, forgive yourself. Give yourself credit for good things and small wins.

Taking Care of Yourself

A health self-esteem translates into accepting and valuing yourself for exactly who you are, even your flaws. Rearranging your thoughts and prioritizing emotional self-care takes time and practice. The more you challenge your negative thoughts and habits, the greater the pride you can take in yourself. Remember, there is only one unique you, and you are valuable to this world!

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Learn To Love Your Body, Inside and Out

September 16, 2014

“Mirror, mirror on the wall… who’s the thinnest one of all?” According to the National Eating Disorders Association, the average American woman is 5’4″ tall and weights 140 pounds. The average runway model is 5’11” tall and weighs 117 pounds. All too often, society associates being “thin” with “hardworking, beautiful, strong and self-disciplined.” On the other hand, being “fat” is associated with being “lazy, ugly, weak and lacking willpower.” Because of these harsh critiques, rarely are women completely satisfied with their image. As a result, they often feel great anxiety and pressure to achieve and/or maintain an imaginary appearance.

Eating disorders are serious medical problems. Anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder are all types of eating disorders. Eating disorders frequently develop during adolescence or early adulthood, but can also occur during childhood or later in adulthood. Females are more likely than males to develop an eating disorder.

Eating disorders are more than just a problem with food. Food is used to feel in control of other feelings that may seem overwhelming. For example, starving is a way for people with anorexia to feel more in control of their lives to ease tension, anger, and anxiety. Purging and other behaviors to prevent weight gain are ways for people with bulimia to feel more in control of their lives and to ease stress and anxiety.

While there is no single known cause of eating disorders, several things may contribute to their development.

  • Culture. Women partially define themselves by how physically attractive they are.
  • Personal characteristics. Feelings of helplessness, worthlessness, and poor self-image often accompany eating disorders.
  • Other emotional disorders. Other mental health problems, like depression or anxiety, occur along with eating disorders.
  • Stressful events or life changes. Things like starting a new school or job or being teased about traumatic events like rape can lead to the onset of eating disorders.
  • Biology. Studies are being done to look at genes, hormones, and chemicals in the brain that may have an effect on the develop of, and recovery from, eating disorders.
  • Families. The attitude of parents about appearance and diet affects their kids’ attitudes. Also, if your mother or sister has bulimia, you are more likely to have it.

If you think you or a loved on may have an eating disorder give us a call at 850-226-8585 or 850-689-7844 to set up an appointment.

Time Out For Affirmations

December 23, 2013

People who use affirmations say consistently repeating the brief statements inspires them to achieve personal development goals. The following affirmations focus on some common self-improvement goals. Try repeating them to yourself.

To take control of time

  • I am master of my schedule.
  • I determine what is important and give it priority.
  • I recognize and deal with conflicting time demands.
  • I can create my own quiet time.

To succeed in a love relationship

  • I enjoy being in a relationship and sharing my life.
  • I enjoy it when my partner keeps growing, even in areas where I am not involved.
  • I show my love in public and in the privacy of our home and family.

To free yourself from stress

  • I am relaxed in mind and body.
  • I create tranquility.
  • I feel calm.

To deal with a life-changing event

  • I have the strength to overcome adversity.
  • I can handle this now because I know things will get better again.
  • When one door closes, another opens.

To overcome fears and obstacles

  • I am full of courage and confidence.
  • I remove limitations I have placed on myself.
  • I am free to pursue any goals I desire.

To feel comfortable about making mistakes

  • I accept that I am human, that I sometimes make mistakes.
  • I am not perfect, and nobody expects me to be perfect.
  • I can face my mistakes calmly and take appropriate corrective action without shame.

To set and achieve goals

  • I strive for (your goal) and will work to make it happen.
  • I am master of my future.
  • (Your goal) is important to me, and I will achieve it.

To build self-esteem

  • I celebrate my uniqueness.
  • I am competent and capable.
  • I believe in myself as no one else can.

To be more assertive

  • I am cooperative and understanding, but I can say “no” and still feel good about myself.
  • I make good decisions, and I am in control of my life.
  • I handle difficult situations effectively.

To express anger in healthy ways

  • My anger is an energy I can use positively.
  • I move away from the source of my anger.
  • I visualize a safe, quiet place when I am angry.